Alaskan Malamute

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Alaskan Malamute

BreedHighlighs:
 
The Alaskan malamute is one of the oldest sledge dogs. Their ancestors came from Siberia to America via the Bering Strait, as a faithful companion of the indigenous tribe known as Mahlemuts. They used their dogs to hunt the seals, to scare polar bears and to pull heavy loads.
Towards the end of the 19th century, during the gold rush, demand for sledge dogs was so great that many prospectors mixed their sledge dogs with other breeds, making the purebred Alaska Malamute almost extinct. Due to their isolated existence, the dogs of the Mahlemuts remained pure and the race was saved.
Weight:
32-43 kg
Height:
56-66 cm
Life Expectancy:
10-12 yr
Litter Size:
4-10
Breed Appearance:

A wolf-like breed in appearance, the Alaskan Malamute is a large, imposing breed of dog who has typical Spitz characteristics (a tail often curled over the back, a very thick coat, erect ears, and a wedge-shaped head. The head is broad. Ears are triangular and erect when alerted. The muzzle is bulky, only slight diminishing in width from root to nose. The muzzle is not pointed or long, yet not stubby. The coat is thick with a coarse guard coat of sufficient length to protect a woolly undercoat. Malamutes are of various colours. Face markings are a distinguishing feature.

History:
The Alaskan malamute is one of the oldest sledge dogs. Their ancestors came from Siberia to America via the Bering Strait, as a faithful companion of the indigenous tribe known as Mahlemuts. They used their dogs to hunt the seals, to scare polar bears and to pull heavy loads.
Towards the end of the 19th century, during the gold rush, demand for sledge dogs was so great that many prospectors mixed their sledge dogs with other breeds, making the purebred Alaska Malamute almost extinct. Due to their isolated existence, the dogs of the Mahlemuts remained pure and the race was saved.
Originally:
One of the oldest Arctic sledge dog breeds, researchers assumed wolf-dogs were the ancestors of Alaskan Malamutes. These wolves stayed with the Palaeolithic nomads that walked on land bridges of the Bering Strait and went to North America 4000 years ago. Alaskan Malamutes were believed to be bred by the nomadic Inuit tribe, Mahlemut, of the Kotzebue Sound of north-western Alaska. These dogs were originally used to hunt seals, fend off polar bears, and haul heavy loads filled with food or camp supplies at low speeds over great distances.
Currently Used As:
Alaskan Malamutes are still in use as sledge dogs for personal travel, hauling freight, or helping move light objects; some, however, are used for the recreational pursuit of sledging, also known as mushing, as well as for skijoring, bikejoring, carting, and canicross.
Training:
Alaskan Malamutes are very challenging to train and live with. Without sufficient exercise and challenging things to do, Malamutes become rambunctious and bored, which they usually express by chronic howling and destructive chewing. Bored Alaskan Malamutes are famous for chewing through drywall, ripping the stuffing out of sofas, and turning your yard into a moonscape of giant craters.
Health&Care:
Health concerns that the Alaskan Malamute may be predisposed to include: Canine Hip Dysplasia, Cataracts, Chondrodysplasia, Polyneuropathy, Hypothyroidism, Seizures and Gastric Torsion (bloat).
Living Condition:
They're Arctic dogs, not designed by nature to live in hot, humid environments. If your Malamute lives in the Sunbelt, be sure to provide them with plenty of shade, freshwater, and air conditioning during the summer, and avoid exercise in the heat of the day.
Excersie:
Malamutes need a minimum of two hours of heavy exercise every day. This can be spent running and walking so they can let off steam. As well as this, they'll also need extra playtime, free time in the garden and training to help keep their brains active too.
Grooming:
The Alaskan Malamute does require regular bathing and brushing. This bright and dignified dog can be bathed as frequently as weekly up to no longer than every 6 weeks. With this double-coated breed, proper bathing and drying techniques lays the groundwork for achieving a beautiful coat and healthy skin.
Pros:
Intelligence Loyalty Protection Pack Mentality Playfulness
Cons:
Hard to Train Ability to Overpower Requires a lot of Exercise High Maintenance Expensive to Feed